FAQ for Turning Point Psychotherapy

Are you having a problem you can’t seem to overcome on your own? You’re not alone. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, one out of four American adults experience anxiety, depression or some other clinically significant form of psychological stress in any given year.

Are you having difficulty coping with a serious illness, losing weight or stopping smoking?

Are you struggling to cope with relationship troubles, work-related stress, the death of a loved one, food or substance abuse or other issues? These problems are likely to get worse the longer they go untreated with professional assistance. contact me.

  1. What is psychotherapy?
  2. Will it work for me?
  3. What is “cognitive behavioral” therapy?
  4. Does it mean that I am ‘ill’ if I’m in psychotherapy?
  5. How long will it take?
  6. How often are the sessions?
  7. How long does each session last?
  8. What benefit should I feel afterwards?
  9. Does it usually work?
  10. What can go wrong?
  11. How will I feel during therapy?
  12. How much will I have to do myself?
  13. How will it affect people close to me?
  14. Can I stop if I feel it’s not working?
  15. If it doesn’t work what else can I do?
  16. Is individual therapy “better” than group therapy?
  17. What about vacations and canceled sessions?
  18. Will I need to stop medication?
  19. What do I do in an emergency or crisis?
  20. What kind of records are kept?
  21. What are other professionals involved in my care told about me?
  22. Who do I complain to if I am not satisfied with the service I receive?
  23. How can I find out more about psychotherapy?

Answers to FAQ for Turning Point Psychotherapy

1. What is psychotherapy?
Turning Point Psychotherapy can help you work through such problems. Turning Point Psychotherapy helps adolescents and adults of all ages live happier, healthier and more productive lives.

Turning Point Psychotherapy applies scientifically validated procedures to help people develop healthier, more effective habits. We use several modalities — including cognitive-behavioral, solution-focused and other kinds of talk therapy — that help individuals work through their problems.

Turning Point Psychotherapy takes a collaborative approach to developing treatment with clients. By providing a supportive and confidential environment, you can talk openly with someone who’s objective, neutral and nonjudgmental. We work together to identify and change patterns in thinking and behavioral choices that are keeping you from feeling your best.

By the time you’re done, you will not only have solved the problem that brought you in, but you will have learned new skills so you can better cope with whatever challenges arise in the future.

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2. Will it work for me?
Many people feel a great deal of benefit from psychotherapy, some even after comparatively few meetings. Like any other treatment approach, psychotherapy may not be suitable for everyone. You must decide what works for you. The initial consultation’s aim is to help you reflect on this. Clinical experience shows that if you are motivated and set yourself realistic goals, psychotherapy is likely to help.
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3. What is “cognitive behavioral” therapy?
Cognitive behavioral therapy is based on listening and talking. Its method is to uncover patterns of thinking and feeling that are causing you to feel poorly and influence poor choices. CBT is based on the premise that thoughts create feelings which create behaviors.
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4. Does it mean that I am ‘ill’ if I’m in psychotherapy?
Regardless of how you were referred, psychotherapy aims to treat people who are having difficulties functioning at home, at work, at school or in relationships. This could be the result of a serious mental illness, or a lack of skill in adaptive thinking, emotion regulation and behavior. The symptoms you would like to treat might have led to you having been diagnosed with mental illness. The aim in psychotherapy is to look more deeply into the emotions, conflicts and distress behind these diagnoses.
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5. How long will it take?
The length of treatment will be determined by what you are offered following assessment. A brief course of psychotherapy would last about three months, and a course of group therapy or long term individual therapy can last for a couple of years. The benefits of psychotherapy can continue long after the treatment period itself has finished.
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6.How often are the sessions?
Services with Turning Point Psychotherapy happen one to two times weekly depending on the severity of the circumstances or the momentum with which you would like to address your issues, although treatment could be as frequent as up to three times per week in certain circumstances.
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7. How long does each session last?
Initial individual/couple/family sessions last 80 minutes, follow up sessions normally last fifty minutes, and group therapy meetings are for 80 minutes. Some specialized groups are for longer than this.
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8. What benefit should I feel afterwards?
Research has shown that psychotherapy is effective in reducing symptoms, improving relationships and self esteem. However, as each person is an individual it is difficult to generalize at the beginning as to which benefits a person may feel. The exploration and the journey is often as important as the goal.
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9. Does it usually work?
A great deal of research has been done in the last few years to demonstrate that psychotherapy is effective. However, it only works as a catalyst with the person undergoing treatment. This means that in order to be effective, the “work” is not done to you – but by you and with you.
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10.What can go wrong?
Psychotherapy may uncover underlying problems that are not responsive to psychotherapeutic treatment. These may then mean that decisions have to be made about discontinuing therapy and other treatment that might then be necessary. During the course of therapy it may be tempting to use less helpful coping skills, such as alcohol and drugs, that may have been familiar to you in the past.
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11. How will I feel during therapy?
It is possible that you may feel worse before you feel better, and some people find their psychological distress is reflected in physical symptoms such as headaches or stomach pains. Therapy requires an uncovering of painful feelings and memories. This can be experienced as a relief but it may also stir up uncomfortable feelings.
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12. How much will I have to do myself?
Therapy is an active process, like a journey of self exploration. I can offer guidance, but the ultimate responsibility for changing is with you.
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13. How will it affect people close to me?
Our view of yourself and others may alter considerably through therapy. As you change, your relationships will change too – and it can disrupt the equilibrium of current intimate relationships. You need to bear this in mind before you start, and you may want to discuss it with people close to you. As this is a common experience, your I will be familiar with it and will be willing to discuss it with you.
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14. Can I stop if I feel it’s not working?
It is always possible to leave therapy, though the pressure to remain may seem stressful at times. Some people have to have several “goes” at therapy before they succeed. Talk about your difficulties with me before you decide to stay or leave. Ultimately, if you want to stop, it is up to you.
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15. If it doesn’t work what else can I do?
Looking at why it may not be working with is often an important thing to discuss. However, psychotherapy is only one treatment option and it does not suit everybody. I will make recommendations about referring you on to a more suitable form of treatment, if this is likely to be helpful.
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16. Is individual therapy “better” than group therapy?
Individual therapy is often more comfortable to contemplate starting. However, for many psychological difficulties, group work can be more effective. The aim of the full psychotherapy assessment which occurs during our initial session is to assess whether individual or group is best, and this will depend on your problems and background. It is quite common to be offered a few sessions of individual therapy, followed by joining a group.
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17. What about vacations and canceled sessions?
Cancellation of Turning Point Psychotherapy requires 48 hours advance notice for cancellation.
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18. Will I need to stop medication?
Not unless you and doctor have consulted with one another and feel it is appropriate. If so, your doctor will advise you accordingly.
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19. What do I do in an emergency or crisis?
As psychotherapy is not an emergency service, you will need to use your normal network of support. This could include family and friends in the first instance, but also other agencies – such as you’re the nearest Emergency Room, a Suicide Crisis Line or 911, depending on what you need at the time. It is important to bring the difficulties you experienced to my attention at the next session.
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20. What kind of records are kept?
Psychotherapy records contain any questionnaires you have completed and returned, any letters you send and copies of any letters sent to you. There will also be a summary of your assessment and documentation of any contact with other treatment professionals whom you’ve given me written consent to communicate with. Notes from the process of your treatment, including your attendance and content of the sessions, are also kept. If there are details you do not wish to have recorded in your file, please discuss this with me.
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21. What are other professionals involved in my care told about me?
I may consult with other colleagues regarding the nature of your case, and the necessary details about the therapy will be discussed in this. This process helps me think about what is going on, and maintains the safety of our therapeutic relationship. I do not disclose identifying information during case consultations.
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22. Who do I complain to if I am not satisfied with the service I receive?
You have the right to file a complaint with the Secretary of the federal Department of Health and Human Services or with the California Board of Behavioral Sciences or with the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists.
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23. How can I find out more about psychotherapy?
There are many psychotherapy resources available in books and on the internet. However, not all this information is of good quality and much of it may not be relevant to you. There is no substitute for discussing it with professionals involved in your care.
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